The Divorce of Peace and Justice

It’s so easy to miss the critically important issues when focusing on materialistic concerns.

From the Christian Science Monitor: Peace before justice in Darfur “The UN must suspend an indictment of Sudan’s leader if it will bring a peace settlement.”

From the Chicago Tribune: Peace vs. justice in Sudan “…all the chest-thumping about justice being the enemy of peace rings hollow in light of the sad truth, which is that the on-again, off-again peace process—currently off—hasn’t gotten anywhere.”

From the Ottawa Citizen: Justice vs. peace “The ICC…is caught in a collision course between peace and justice in four African countries where it is working on cases.”

So…

I’ll stop trying to keep you from hurting me if you just say you’ll stop hurting me…

Or…

We know how much pain and suffering you’ve caused and we fear you greatly. We fear you so much we’re willing to not try to stop you if you’ll just sit down and talk.

Hmmm…

See that poisonous snake ready to bite you again? Just forget about that and talk some sense into it !

If my loving mother hadn’t, in all justice, slapped my hand away from that stove, I wouldn’t have a hand that peacefully avoids dangerous heat.

Why not weigh in on this discussion? I’ll admit it’s not necessarily an easily solved issue and my analogies may be rather weak but, really, what do you think?

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“Until the actions of humankind promote justice above the satisfaction of greed and readjusts the world’s economies accordingly, the gap between the rich and the poor will continue to widen, and the dream of sustainable economic growth, peace, and prosperity must remain elusive.”
Bahá’í International Community, 1993 Feb 12, Human Rights and Extreme Poverty

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Money To Burn


CNN: Zimbabwe introduces $100 billion banknotes
Each bill “…can buy only four oranges. The new note is equal to just one U.S. dollar.”
“…the official inflation rate now at 2.2 million percent.”
“The new bills are actually bearer checks and have an expiration date of December 31.”

BBC: Zimbabwe introduces Z$100bn note
“Zimbabwe’s meltdown has left at least 80% of the population in poverty, facing mass shortages of basic goods.”
From a resident: “So Z$100 billion can’t do anything because for me to go home I need Z$250 billion, so this [note] is worthless.”
“Zimbabwe was once one of the richest countries in Africa.”

Stunning in its sadness and surrealism . . .

What causes such gross failure?

Why does it seem the haves could care less about the have-nots?

What does it take for people to realize that we’re all people?

Ever wonder how long the masses are going to take these sinister lies they’re being told?

Of course, making people starve is a very old technique used by oppressors. The oppressors don’t even have to live in the same country as the sufferers, especially in our global home.

Makes me want to cry . . .

“The dragon, symbol of heaven, comes to fight the false dragon that symbolized the inflation of the earth principle.”
I Ching

“Nations, though exhausted and disillusioned, have seemingly begun to cherish anew the spirit of revenge, of domination, and strife. Peoples, convulsed by economic upheavals, are slowly drifting into two great opposing camps with all their menace of social chaos, class hatreds, and worldwide ruin. Races, alienated more than ever before, are filled with mistrust, humiliation and fear, and seem to prepare themselves for a fresh and fateful encounter. Creeds and religions, caught in this whirlpool of conflict and passion, appear to gaze with impotence and despair at this spectacle of unceasing turmoil.”
Shoghí Effendí, Bahá’í Administration, p. 67

“Today, the agency on whom has devolved the task of creating this framework and of liberating the promotion of human rights from those who would exploit it is the system of international institutions born out of the tragedies of two ruinous world wars and the experience of worldwide economic breakdown. Significantly, the term ‘human rights’ has come into general use only since the promulgation of the United Nations Charter in 1945 and the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights three years later. In these history-making documents, formal recognition has been given to respect for social justice as a correlative of the establishment of world peace. The fact that the Declaration passed without a dissenting vote in the General Assembly conferred on it from the outset an authority that has grown steadily in the intervening years.”
Bahá’í International Community, 1995 Mar 03, The Prosperity of Humankind

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